Prior to 1885, the pioneering barangays of Candelaria in its western part notably, Taguan, Kinatihan and Masin were parts of the Municipality of Tiaong, whileMalabanban, Mangilag and Sta. Catalina in the east were under the jurisdiction of the town of Sariaya.

Sr. Don Ciriaco Nadres, a local leader of Barangay Masinand his wife Sra. Doña Baltazara Bustamante, with the support of Don Simeon Nadres and wife Doña Everista Ona, Don Justo Argao, Don Elino de Gala, Don Apolinario Gonzales, Don Tomas Cabuñag, Don Ignacio de Ramos, Don Domingo de Alday, Don Tomas Regidor, Don Juan del Valle, Don Ambrocio Salazar, Don Buenaventura Cedeño and Don Hipolito Martinez, proposed the establishment of an independent government over these barangays. They became known as the founding families of the town.

This request was granted by Gobernador General Domingo Moriones y Murillo. It was declared as an independent pueblosibil on December 26, 1878 and from then became known as Candelaria. Its boundaries were fixed by means of a treaty signed by the notable leaders of Tiaong, Sariaya and the founding families of Candelaria.

The King of Spain, His Majesty Alfonso XII, finally approved the establishment of Candelaria as an independent town on August 5, 1879.

After its defeat in the Spanish-American War of 1898, Spain ceded its longstanding colony of the Philippines to the United States in the Treaty of Paris.When it became clear that U.S. forces were intent on imposing American colonial control over the islands, the early clashes between the Filipinos and the Americans in 1899 swelled into an all-out war.In 1902, general hostilities against the Americans ceded. However, effects of the war prompted Candelaria to seek the folds of the town of Sariaya.

But the pioneering spirit of its founders was not extinguished in the battlefield. In 1908, after almost seven years of dependent existence, Candelaria was again able to stand on its own feet. It was then a fourth class municipality.

Even as the fighting went on, the colonial government that the United States established in the Philippines launched a pacification campaign that became known as the “policy of attraction.” This policy permitted a significant degree of self-government, introduced social reforms, and implemented plans for economic development. During this time, the town has progressed by leaps and bounds. Many houses and public edifices were constructed and commerce and industries grew, until the Japanese invasion. When the Japanese occupied the Philippines during the Second World War, Candelaria’s growth regressed.

It was on June 6, 1946 that Candelaria was liberated against the Japanese Imperial Army.

The municipality of Candelaria is acknowledged as the second largest industrial center of the province, after Lucena City, and is now a first class municipality. It has the most number of desiccated coconut factories and oil mills among the municipalities in Quezon Province.

MAYORS OF THE CANDELARIA, QUEZON
1908 – 1912 HERMENIGILDO NADRES
1912 – 1917 JUAN JAVIER
1917 – 1918 GENEROSO DE GALA*
1917 – 1918 GREGORIO REMATA*
1919 – 1920 HERMENIGILDO NADRES
1920 – 1922 FRANCISCO FERNANDEZ
1922 – 1925 MANSUETO JAVIER
1926 – 1928 DAVID REYROZO
1929 – 1931 DR. EMILIO DE GALA
1931 – 1934 DR. GENEROSO NADRES
1937 – 1939 FELIX ONA
1939 – 1941 PASTOR G. JAVIER
1942 – 1945 ** JUAN RAMOS (APPOINTED)
FRANCISCO MALABANAN (Appointed)
CRESENCIANO DE GALA (Appointed)
1945 – 1947 FELIX B. ONA (Appointed, Liberation Period)
1937 – 1939 FELIX ONA
1939 – 1941 PASTOR G. JAVIER
1947 – 1951 ELIGIO A. MANALO
1951 – 1960 ELIGIO A. MANALO ***
1960 – 1967 VENANCIO N. DIA
1968 – 1978 CIPRIANO MALIWANAG
1978 – 1986 PEDRO M. CEDEÑO
1998 – 2001 ISIDRO L. DE GALA
2001 – 2007 DAVID V. EMRALINO
2007 – 2016 ATTY. FERDINAND R. MALIWANAG
2016 – Present HON. MACARIO D. BOONGALING
* There was a tie in the election of 1916, G. de Gala was appointed; G. Remata elected Vice Mayor, assumed office after the controversy was settled.
** Japanese Occupation—War broke out in Candelaria (December)
*** No Opposition